Friday, March 7, 2008

Whole Wheat Pasta With Chicken Sausage And Portobello Tomato Sauce

Here's another recipe that was prepared and enjoyed just prior to the flu making its dastardly visit to chez moi. Top billing is shared by two ingredients in this dish:
the fabulous organic whole durum wheat pasta "snails" produced in Italy by Bionaturae, and the delicious nitrite free California Chicken Sausage made with basil and sun-dried tomatoes by California's own Premiere Meats. Located in Mt. Shasta, this company actually started out here in Humboldt county about 10 miles from my kitchen.
Just look at these cool whole wheat pasta pouches - their little mouths eagerly agape, awaiting the saucy morsels that will tumble in. The ridges on the outside enable the sauce to adhere there as well. Called chiocciole, this organic Italian import may be purchased on line here, but I got mine at our local Co-op and am fairly sure you should be able to find it at most good organic food stores.

Portobello mushrooms, sea salt-packed capers and the usual suspects of garlic, onion, organic fire roasted tomatoes, along with white wine and a goodly portion of parmigiano reggiano give their all to this tasty sauce. You want to dice everything so that it matches or is slightly smaller than your pasta shape. This way, the sauce won't overwhelm the pasta.

Whole Wheat Pasta with Chicken Sausage and Portobello Tomato Sauce
Christine's original recipe
Ingredients:
16 ounces Chiocciole pasta or other whole grain pasta
4 Premier Meats California Chicken sausages, diced
2 portobello mushrooms, gills removed and diced
3 cloves garlic, chopped fine
1 14-ounce can Muir Glen Organic Fire Roasted diced tomatoes (simply the best!)
1 1/2 tablespoons salt packed capers, rinsed and drained
1/4 cup dry white wine
1 1/2 cups parmesan, grated
1 tablespoon fresh parsley, finely chopped
olive oil for the pan
Preparation:
Put on a large pot of water for the pasta over high heat. Add about 1 tablespoon kosher salt to the water and bring to a boil.
Meanwhile, place a small amount of olive oil in a heavy skillet and put over medium high heat.
Add the portobellos and mushrooms and saute until the mushrooms are soft, stirring frequently.
Add the garlic, give a stir and cook 1 to 2 minutes.
Add the tomatoes, capers and white wine. Stir again and simmer about 5 minutes or until the juices thicken slightly and everything is piping hot.
When the pasta is cooked, drain it in a colander, put it back into the cooking pot and drizzle with a small amount of olive oil. Give it a quick stir.
Just before serving, stir the parmesan into the sauce.
Serve on warmed plates, sprinkling each serving with the chopped parsley.




Copyright © 2005-2008, Christine Cooks. All rights reserved

7 comments:

Kalyn said...

Oooh, I want some of that pasta. I just got some whole wheat Italian spaghetti from Costco that I'm really loving. (Good thing because I have 8 packages of it!)

Saving this so I can remember how you used it and what the name of the pasta is, and I'll look for it here.

Simona said...

I bought that pasta last week. You know, it was one of my favorite shapes when I was a kid, because the tomato sauce goes inside. And today I was about to make it, then opted for some farfalle instead. I am glad to hear it is good.

katiez said...

I love that shape - same reasons!
Now, if I can only get mon mari to like integral pasta... slowly, slowly...
Great looking dish

Cynthia said...

I'm so excited by the sauce I don't think I'll bother with the pasta :)

Christine said...

Hi Kalyn, I hope you can find the pasta is SL. It's definitely worth tracking down.

How funny that we seem to make the same things at the same time, Simona. What a wave length we're on! I'll make it for you next time you come over, OK?

Glad you like it, Katie. I've been loving your posts. Great cook, humorous writer!

Hi there Cynthia. I could have eaten just the sauce also!

Anonymous said...

I was thinking the sauce looks good too as I can't eat the pasta.
Anne

Christine said...

I know that gluten-free pasta exists somewhere in the world, Anne. Have you looked on line?