Friday, April 2, 2010

Gluten Free, Sugar Free Buttermilk Tea Bread

I cannot take the credit for this luscious gluten free tea bread.  That would go to Britt of GF in the City.

Yep. I took her recipe, left out the bananas, made a few other changes, and offer it to you here - with no credit to myself.

I've said before that I didn't inherit the baking genes in my family.  Those belong mostly to my sister Di, with sister Cyn running a close second.  So when I want to bake, unless it's a dirt simple recipe like this, I go recipe hunting.

For anyone who eats gluten free and occasionally gets cravings for a nice slice of moist, slightly sweet bread with their afternoon tea, this is the loaf to make.  It's easy to whip up and may be stored in the fridge for a week or so, or in the freezer for several months.  What are you waiting for?

Gluten Free, Sugar Free Buttermilk Tea Bread
Recipe adapted from GF in the City
(print recipe)
Ingredients:
1 cup sweet white sorghum flour
1/2 cup finely ground almonds, or almond flour
1/4 cup potato starch
1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup unsalted butter, room temperature
12 packets Splenda or 1/2 cup sugar if preferred
2 eggs
3/4 cup buttermilk
Preparation:
In the bowl of an electric mixer, cream the butter and Splenda until smooth and creamy.  Add the eggs, one at a time and beat well.
In a separate bowl, combine all the dry ingredients, stirring with a whisk to incorporate.
Adding the dry ingredients first and last, alternate dry with the buttermilk until all of it has been used.  Beat thoroughly.
Put batter into a large loaf pan that has been sprayed with a non-stick spray and bake at 350-degrees for about 45 minutes.  When the bread is done, the top will be golden and crusty and a toothpick inserted into the loaf will come out clean.
Allow the loaf to rest in the pan for about 5 minutes then turn onto a rack to finish cooling.

This bread holds its own in a toaster so if you're toast-deprived like I am, give it a try.

Happy cooking!










Copyright © 2005-2010, Christine Cooks. All rights reserved

9 comments:

Sophie said...

Hello Christine!!

What a fab & apart looking bread!!

I will use the dark, raw sugar & will make this lovely endresult!

MMMMMM,...greets from rainy & chilly Brussels!

Penny said...

This looks like a very satisfying bread Christine. I left you another message on your previous post.

Kalyn said...

It looks delicious! I've never cooked with sorghum flour; don't even know for sure what it is.

Mimi from French Kitchen said...

I could make that. I might even have sorghum flour on hand.

Or I could make a gluten free chocolate cake from a mix...

Britt said...

This looks wonderful! The next time I'm waiting (impatiently) for my bananas to go black, I may have to make this version to hold me over. Ooh, and it would be the perfect thing to bring to a brunch with a good jar of jam. I love it--well done!

Christine said...

I bet your bread will be delicious Sophie.

Thanks Penny! I got your other message - thanks again! :)

Sorghum is a cereal grain, Kalyn, somewhat related to maize, often called milo, used mostly for animal fodder in the US but popularity is growing for the flour because it's gluten free. It is not, however, low glycemic, and I nibble judiciously. :)

Hi Mimi. I heard about B. Crocker's gluten free cake mixes. The jury is still out on that ... :)

Folks, meet Britt! She's so lovely, she's not mad that I stole her recipe. Go to her blog - it's great!

Sam said...

Hi Christine, thanks for stopping in at Samwich365.com. This bread looks and sounds awesome. I think I may try it. Loving all of your posts and plan to come back often. Hope you'll do the same and we can share recipes. Take care, Keri (a.k.a. Sam)

Anonymous said...

Hi,

I tried this recipe and it was lovely with a soft texture and buttery taste. I halved the recipe, and just used 2tbsps of agave which was still sweet and threw in a handful of currants. Very good. Thanks for sharing

Christine said...

Your version sound mighty good, Anonymous. Thanks for the feedback!