Saturday, October 31, 2009

Christine's Recipe For Creamy, Garlicky Chevre Sauce With Steamed Green Beans And Toasted Pecans

While it's true that I'm no longer eating pasta, it is not true that I can't enjoy a thick and deliciously creamy pasta sauce from time to time. I just drizzle it over steamed, sautéed or roasted vegetables and I'm completely happy.

Intensely garlicky, beginning with a white wine reduction, this is a sauce that will compliment a number of vegetables served as an entrée or a side dish. (Mr CC even enjoyed it on his lunch tacos!)

Last week we roasted purple potatoes and topped them with this sauce along with some freshly chopped basil.

Decidedly unphotogenic in its white-on-white demeanor, roasted cauliflower nonetheless is the perfect compliment to the garlic and goat cheese flavors imbued here.

For its debut, however, green beans steamed to a tender crispness were the perfect vehicle to showcase this bright white saucy offering, needing only a sprinkling of chopped toasted pecans to round out the visual feast.

This sauce can be made with full, low or no fat dairy. The amount you use will need to be adjusted to achieve the creaminess you desire. It's ready for your vegetables in less than 25 minutes and will keep in the refrigerator for one week.

Christine's Creamy, Garlicky Chevre Sauce
6-ounces dry white wine
5 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
2 pinches kosher salt
1 cup cream (or 1/2 & 1/2, or milk)
11-ounces good chevre (goat cheese), crumbled
Place the white wine and the minced garlic in a medium saucepan over medium high heat. Bring to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer until the wine has reduced by one-half, about 6 minutes.
Add the salt and stir.
Add the chevre and the cream and whisk over low heat until the mixture is smooth. The amount of milk product will vary depending on its fat content.
Serve over your favorite vegetables or roasted potatoes, or, gasp!, pasta.
Reserve left over sauce in the refrigerator.

Copyright © 2005-2009, Christine Cooks. All rights reserved


Anonymous said...

Sounds really tasty, will have to try this

recipes said...
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Lydia (The Perfect Pantry) said...

I think it's fun to use sauces that would traditionally go on pasta on other things -- beans, yes, and also asparagus, strips of zucchini, spaghetti squash. This sauce will work on any of those vegetables.

Sophie said...

Hello Christine,

this meal loooks truly delicious!!

I have some good news for you!! In the next 365 days, you will be recieving a Pay it forward package from me from Brussels, Belgium!! Hoeray!!!
But you must do the same to 3 other persons!!
Please, send me an email @ my emailadresse:, with your full name & adresse please!! I will send you my adresse too, so that we can send each other Christmas cards!

Christine said...

I'm looking forward to receiving my package, Sophie. Thanks! I'll send you an email with allo the particulars when I return home tomorrow.

Jann said...

I just happened to run into a person today who sold me some fresh chevre~guess what I will be making very soon.

Christine said...

I'd love to know how you like it, Jann. Happy cooking!

Mimi from French Kitchen said...

I;m no longer eating pasta, also, but I recently went on a chevre buying spree. This sounds wonderful!

Karine said...

What an amazing way to enjoy pasta sauce! It is original :)

Christine said...

Good chevre is hard to beat, isn't it Mimi?

Thanks so much Karine. I love how versatile this sauce is.

Paz said...

I like the title. Makes my mouth water. ;-)


Christine said...

Thank you, Paz! Hope you are well.

tobias cooks! said...

this is truly different. Thai Style and saussage :-)

Lisa said...

This is fantastic! I've tagged it for near-future enjoyment. We're lucky to have producers of beautiful goat cheese right in our area, so we can get fresh chevre virtually any time.

Christine said...

Anne and Lydia, I'm so sorry I missed your comments. Don't know what happened there!

Thanks Tobias.

I'm glad you have a source of good local chevre, Lisa. I don't know what I'd do without mine. Glad you like the recipe.